Show me the wind

Early in 2020, we were made to explain to children, why a virus that we could not see was forcing us do so many things differently. Months go by and we need to keep this conversation going. It is important to continue the discussion with children and among adults, about what we are collectively going through and how we feel about it.

They draw themselves, the family, the family pet, the nearby trees, street traffic and maybe the virus too. Did you ask your child to draw the wind yet? Please do, and take this opportunity to continue a conversation about what our eyes cannot readily see. A much useful conversation about what is invisible but real, as opposed to what is invisible and indeed does not exist. Make sure to conclude this conversation with safety measures and the cooperation needed to keep COVID-19 at bay.

See how your child can figure out how to draw the wind. After the drawing is made, watch together how others have done it. Visit the playlists we are compiling on our newly created Youtube channel. We just bookmarked this one minute video showing one way to draw the wind.

How to draw the wind, by How to for kids. Source: Youtube, 18 October 2020.

When it’s all up to you

As a parent, you may be an art enthusiast and your child’s biggest fan. You have set up a creative corner, you have a framing and display system in place in the kitchen or elsewhere in the home. Most of all, you involve your child in decision making, when comes the time to keep, re-use or dispose of drawings. Your disappointment comes when each time you ask, your child does not share your interest and suggests that everything can just go in the trash.

Drawing and what comes out of it might just not be your child’s number one interest and it is perfectly fine. Your artistic inclination does not have to converge with your parental guidance and judgement. It is probably time for you to decide whether collecting your child’s images is your own project, for the time being. As a parent, cherishing and keeping traces of your child’s cognitive progress, imaginative storytelling, and his or her interpretations of play and family moments, can be your own personal project. Your child might not be that interested at the moment, but what about when she or he will have grown up? You might want to know what the reaction will be years from now, when you open your precious archives. Joy and gratefulness will most likely be the response. And even then, if it is not and you are instead met a “but why”, you will know exactly why and will not regret a moment of it.

My dream, by Valerie, c1982. Source: CDIC-CIDE, 12 October 2020.

Drawing siblings

Whether you are a parent or an educator, it is a good idea from time to time, to ask a child for a family drawing, and to pay attention to the depiction of siblings. The image may reveal aspects of the child’s emotional and social life that you would like to discuss with the child, or with another adult involved in the child’s education.

Siblings may have constant and intense interactions (think twins, but also school mates) or have only family time together with parents, like during meals, and only sporadic joint activities by themselves. Age difference, interests and affinities have of course an impact on sibling interactions, but circumstances, parenting, neighborhood, extended family and even interior design may impact on how siblings grow together.

The family drawing will be particularly useful while mommy is pregnant, when a sibling begins or changes school, or after major changes such as moving, separation or marriage. On the family drawing, look for specific activities siblings do, how they dress, size and place on the page, in relation to parents and self. For further reading on this subject, see the research article by Özge Metin and Elif Üstün of the Department of Early Education, Hacettepe University, Ankara. This analysis of seven drawings was published in 2010 in Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, Vol. 2, Issue 2.

Figure 5, Reflection of sibling relationships into the kinetic family drawings during the preschool period. By Özge Metin and Elif Üstün. Source: Sciencedirect.com, 4 October 2020.